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English

English is vital for communicating with others in school and in the wider world, and it is fundamental to learning in all curriculum subjects. In studying English, pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to participate in society and employment. Pupils learn to express themselves creatively and imaginatively and to communicate with others confidently and effectively.

Literature in English is rich and influential. Pupils learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poetry and drama as well as non-fiction and media texts.

As well as the rich and diverse curriculum offered at KS4, students in KS3 also participate in a range of programmes designed to maximise achievement and progress in every aspect of English:

  • Key groups in KS3 participate in the CATE programme (Creative Approaches to English) where students use drama techniques to explore texts and develop imaginative ideas in order to produce quality writing. Selected small groups of students in CATE lessons also receive focused intervention where they concentrate on improving writing skills.
  • All KS3 students also have RWC lessons (Reading, Writing and Communication)where they focus explicitly on developing key skills and focus on grammar, vocabulary, punctuation and sentence structure.

All KS3 students also partake in the Accelerated Reader programme which enables students to make maximum progress with their reading ages and supports students to develop into confident, able readers.

 

Key Stage 3

Year 7

What will my child learn about in English this year?

Writing to describe

Students will go on a memorable experience trip and use that experience to create a descriptive piece based on a gothic location.

 

‘Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde’

Students will study the novel with a focus on analysing the plot and major characters. The outcome will be to create a written article based on a key event in the novel.

 

Writing POV / Argue

Students will learn how to create a written argument and present a point of view.

 

Poetry: Conflict & Power

Students will explore a selection of war poetry and will develop their analytical skills by writing a comparative essay.

 

Shakespeare Play

Students will study a Shakespeare play with a view to understanding the plot and major characters. They will track the main character over key extracts and will explore changes.

 

Writer’s viewpoints

Students will analyse a selection of extracts written across different time periods which are linked by theme.

 

What type of homework will be set?

Students in KS3 participate in an Accelerated Reader programme and have a set reading homework every week. Every student is expected to read each day for a minimum of 30 minutes. Students are required to fill in their homework bookmarks which parents should check and sign to verify that their child has read their Accelerated Reader book. Additionally, students in KS3 also receive a weekly homework which relates to the topic that they are studying that half term. A range of homework tasks will be given such as reading texts, independent research or redrafting work.

 

How will my child be assessed in English?

Students will be given regular diagnostic feedback in their books and will complete a formal assessment each half term.

 

How can I support my child’s learning at home?

Encouraging your child to read widely and regularly is one of the best ways that you can support your child’s learning at home. Checking your child’s understanding when they read their Accelerated Reader book and asking them questions will help boost their progress. Other useful reading materials include: fiction and non-fiction books, newspapers, articles and magazines.

You can also encourage your child to proofread their work, checking for basic errors of spelling, punctuation and text organisation.

 

Year 8

What will my child learn about in English this year?

Macbeth

Students will explore Macbeth’s relationships with other key characters in the play with an emphasis on his relationship with Lady Macbeth.

 

Writing POV / Argue

Students will examine current issues and will develop compelling arguments based on statements regarding those issues.

 

Gothic Literature

Students will compare key extracts from a range of gothic fiction including ‘Frankenstein’, ‘Dracula’ and ‘H.B. of Notre Dame’. They will analyse the methods that the writer uses to create tension.

 

Writer’s viewpoints

Students will compare the ways in which writers present their viewpoints across a range of extracts and will analyse methods in detail.

 

Poetry:  Female identity and Power

Students will study a range of poems which focus on female perspectives/identity and power.

 

Describe / narrate – Places

Students will use pictures of places as a base for creating powerful, imaginative descriptions and narrative pieces.

 

What type of homework will be set?

Students in KS3 participate in an Accelerated Reader programme and have a set reading homework every week. Every student is expected to read each day for a minimum of 30 minutes. Students are required to fill in their homework bookmarks which parents should check and sign to verify that their child has read their Accelerated Reader book. Additionally, students in KS3 also receive a weekly homework which relates to the topic that they are studying that half term. A range of homework tasks will be given such as reading texts, independent research or redrafting work.

 

How will my child be assessed in English?

Students will be given regular diagnostic feedback in their books and will complete a formal assessment each half term.

 

How can I support my child’s learning at home?

Encouraging your child to read widely and regularly is one of the best ways that you can support your child’s learning at home. Checking your child’s understanding when they read their Accelerated Reader book and asking them questions will help boost their progress. Other useful reading materials include: fiction and non-fiction books, newspapers, articles and magazines.

You can also encourage your child to proofread their work, checking for basic errors of spelling, punctuation and text organisation.

 

Key Stage 4

What will my child learn in English?

In Year 9 and 10, students are following the AQA Literature (8702) and Language (8700) courses. In the Literature course, students will be taught a range of units including a Shakespeare play, a 19th century novel, Modern Drama, Conflict and Power poetry and unseen poetry. Students will be expected to maintain a critical style and develop an informed personal response whilst using textual references. They will analyse the language, form and structure and examine contexts and will be expected to use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation.

In the Language course, students will read literature fiction texts in order to consider how established writers use narrative and descriptive techniques to capture the interest of readers and they will read linked sources from different time periods and genres in order to consider how each presents a perspective or viewpoint to influence the reader.

Students will also write their own creative texts and demonstrate their narrative and descriptive skills in response to a written prompt, scenario or visual image. They will also produce a written text to a specified audience, purpose and form in which they give their own perspective.

Year 11 students are currently following the Cambridge IGCSE English Language course (0522). This course requires the students to produce a coursework portfolio which includes a descriptive piece, a persuasive piece and a response to a text. Students also have to prepare for a Speaking and Listening exam and a reading exam.

 

What type of homework will be set?

Students will be set regular weekly homework tasks where they will be expected to independently read key texts, plan responses to essay/exam questions and complete research tasks which will broaden their understanding of the units being taught within lessons.

Alongside the above homework, every student is expected to read for a minimum of 30 minutes per day.

 

How will my child be assessed in English?

In Year 9 and 10, students will be given regular diagnostic feedback in their books and will complete a formal assessment each half term as well as sitting mock examinations during key points of the year. Students will take their formal exams in Year 11 where they will sit two papers for English Language and two papers for English Literature.

Students will also be assessed on their speaking skills but, as with current GCSEs, the scores will not contribute to the overall grade but will be reported separately.

In Year 11, students will be assessed on their coursework portfolio (40%) Speaking and Listening exam (20%) and their reading exam (40%).

How can I support my child’s learning at home?

Ask your child questions about the homework tasks that they are completing at home and have discussions with them about the issues presented in the texts that they are studying at school in 

order to extend and deepen their understanding.

Encouraging your child to read widely and regularly is one of the best ways that you can support your child’s learning at home. Other useful reading materials include: fiction and non-fiction books, newspapers, articles and magazines.

You can also encourage your child to proofread their work, checking for basic errors of spelling, punctuation and text organisation.

 

What can my child move onto with English?

Studying English Language opens up a lot of career prospects. Potential careers include teaching, journalism, becoming a writer etc. However, there are lots of other jobs where English Language is incredibly useful such as going into marketing, law and advertising. The possibilities are endless! The vast majority of possible career paths will require you to communicate effectively with others, read and create documents and use your skills to describe/argue/persuade.

English and English Literature graduates have a range of literate careers at which to aim - including publishing, journalism, the creative arts, arts administration and teaching. In terms of wider careers, advertising and public relations are popular options, while English graduates can also be found in the civil service and in banking, law and accountancy.

English underpins every professional career, enabling students to progress to senior levels in their chosen careers. The ability to communicate, write and read effectively is an essential part of developing as professionals.